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Cleveland Indians Go Solar

Jacobs Field Goes Solar  See www.greenenergyohio.org/indians
Play June 29, 2007 WKYC News Video of Solar Pavillon Dedication [click here]
 

 
June 29, 2007 Dedication of Jacobs Field Solar Pavillion Dedication
Pictured (L-R): Cleveland Indians' Slider, Bill Spratley of GEO,
Ronn Richard of The Cleveland Foundation, and Ohio Lt. Governor Lee Fisher
celebrate the new solar pavilion at Jacobs Field with a ribbon-cutting ceremony
Cleveland Indians News Release
June 14, 2007

CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Indians and Green Energy Ohio are proud to announce the installation of a new solar electric system at Jacobs Field - the first American League ballpark to go solar. The solar installation will provide 8.4 kilowatts of clean, renewable electricity and introduce solar energy concepts to millions in Northeast Ohio.

Green Energy Ohio will work in concert with Doty and Miller Architects to design and install 42 GE solar panels on a newly erected pavilion which will be located on the south-facing upper deck concourse of Jacobs Field, overlooking Carnegie Avenue and I-90.

The electricity produced from the solar installation is enough to power all of the 400 television sets throughout Jacobs Field.

"The Cleveland Indians are committed to exploring the opportunities to help preserve the environment through the use of advanced energy," said Jim Folk, Indians Vice President of Ballpark Operations. "Using the latest sustainable technologies is not only good for the community, but good for baseball. Working together with Green Energy Ohio, State of Ohio Department of Development, The Cleveland Foundation and Doty and Miller Architects has been a terrific experience in advancing our efforts."

Education is an important aspect of the solar installation at Jacobs Field. Working under a grant from The Cleveland Foundation, Green Energy Ohio is developing a kiosk incorporating data monitoring software to display the output of the solar electric system with a flash program on an LCD monitor at Jacobs Field. The information will also be viewable online. The basics of solar electricity, historical and real-time data, and greenhouse gases avoided will also be explained. A "Solar Day" at Jacobs Field is scheduled for Friday, June 29 in celebration of the project with the community. The Indians play host to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays at 7:05 p.m. that evening.

"We applaud the Cleveland Indians for taking the leadership role in embracing solar power," said Christina Panoska, Program Manager of Green Energy Ohio. "Educating the millions of fans who visit Jacobs Field about renewable energy will be critical to increase the adoption of these technologies."

Support for the solar project is made possible by State of Ohio Department of Development.

The solar installation will be on display during the National SOLAR 2007 conference scheduled at the Cleveland Convention Center from July 7-12. A "Downtown Cleveland Tour" scheduled Sunday, July 8 from 8 a.m.-Noon will include a visit to Jacobs Field. More information is available at www.GreenEnergyOhio.org/solar2007.

About Green Energy Ohio
Green Energy Ohio (GEO) is a non-profit organization that promotes economically and environmentally sustainable energy policies and practices in Ohio. GEO conducts public outreach on all forms of renewable energy, serves as the Ohio ASES Chapter and local host of the National SOLAR 2007 conference. To learn how renewable energy can work for you, visit www.GreenEnergyOhio.org

About Doty and Miller Architects
Doty and Miller Architects was established in 1977 and holds strong beliefs that providing sustainable design services for our clients holds the greats financial, environmental and social benefits to them, their clients and employees for now and the future.

About The Cleveland Foundation
Established in 1914, The Cleveland Foundation is the nation's third-largest community foundation with assets of $1.9 billion. The Foundation improves the lives of Greater Clevelanders by building community endowments, addressing needs through grantmaking, and providing leadership on vital issues. For more information The Cleveland Foundation, please visit www.clevelandfoundation.org.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

 Related News Accounts Below

Jacobs Field Is Going Solar

Cleveland Plain Dealer
Business Section, page 1
June 13, 2007
John Funk

Solar power is joining the big leagues.

From Boston to Cleveland to San Francisco, solar power and other renewable energy projects are on the minds of ballpark executives looking for a way to make a difference in the big game against global warming.

The push is coming from Major League Baseball itself, which has been working for more than a year with the Natural Resources Defense Council, a green group that began as an environmental litigation law firm in the 1970s. Today the council's 300 engineers and scientists also help businesses -- including sports franchises, retailers and industry -- to become more green.

"There has been a real shift, people starting to look at this as less of a niche, a tree-hugger issue, and more as a basic part of day-to-day life, whether running a business or a family household," said council spokesman Jon Coifman.

The Cleveland Indians are installing more than 8,000 watts of solar panels during the next couple of weeks at Jacobs Field, becoming the first American League team to begin lowering its "carbon footprint" by buying less electricity from coal-burning, carbon dioxide-producing power plants.

The cost of the project is about $100,000, said Jim Folk, Indians vice president of ballpark operations. A $10,000 state grant and a 30 percent federal tax credit significantly lowers the final cost.

"In terms of reducing our electric bill, this is not a huge step," said Folk. "But it's a first step -- and it provides an opportunity for people to start talking about solar and advanced energy."

The 42 panels will be the roof a new pavilion designed by Doty & Miller Architects and Planners Inc. of Bedford. The pavilion has been built on the upper concourse overlooking Carnegie Avenue -- visible from I-77 and I-71 approaching downtown.

GreenEnergy Ohio, a renewable energy advocacy group, will staff an information kiosk in the pavilion that will include a running total of power production and savings in greenhouse gases.

(The stadium project, along with an even larger solar array rated at 31,000 watts under construction at the Great Lakes Science Center, will be featured at the American Solar Energy Society's conference here July 7-12. )

The Tribe's installation will beat the Boston Red Sox, who are still researching alternative energy sources and recycling initiatives, said Katie Kirschner, senior manager of business operations.

In the National League, the Colorado Rockies and the San Francisco Giants have quickly moved into green power.

Before the season opener in April, the Rockies turned the switch on 10,000 watts of solar energy, enough capacity to power their scoreboard for the season, said Greg Feasel, senior vice president of operations.

"It will save us over $12,000 a year on our electric bill," said Feasel. "We are also talking with Xcel Energy [the local utility] about adding wind power and changing our lighting."

The Giants have partnered with their local utility, Pacific Gas & Electric, on a truly giant $1 million solar project -- part of a $7 million total city-wide project -- to help San Francisco become the greenest city in the nation.

In March, contractors began installing 590 solar panels on the roof of the team's administration building and on structures that will be a canopy over two walkways around the stadium. It's supposed to be up and running by the All Star Game, July 10.

The array will be able to generate 120 kilowatts (120,000 watts). That's enough to run the club's new HD scoreboard for the entire 81-game season -- if it were to stay inside the stadium.

"The power will go directly into the local utility electric grid," said Giants spokeswoman Shana Daum.

Keely Wachs, of Pacific Gas & Electric, said the utility will seek a rate increase to pay for the stadium project and other solar projects costing another $3 millon. The company itself will pay $2. 5 million for solar projects at schools and nonprofit groups.

Installed U.S. solar capacity grew 30 percent between 2005 and '06, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, and is expected to continue at that rate. Global capacity growth has grown by 45 percent annually since 2001, with Europe, Japan and China leading the way.

For ball clubs, spreading the green gospel -- both to fans who attend games and those watching or listening at home -- may be as important as the actual power generated.

"We think these projects can be a very strong force for environmental consciousness," said John McHale, Major League Baseball's executive vice president for administration.

This summer, he said, the league this summer will announce a major initiative giving every ball club state-of-the art tools to "go green" and to explain to fans why the new emphasis is a must for the nation.

"There are many, many areas in the operation of a baseball stadium, in the operation of the baseball business, and in your relationship with your fans, where you can do good things environmentally," he said.

McHale said the league's big push into green started when two Natural Resource Defense Council board members, actor Robert Redford and GAP Inc. interim chief executive Bob Fisher, whose family has an ownership interest in the Oakland Athletics, convinced Athletics owner Lewis Wolff to contact baseball Commissioner Bud Selig.

"They suggested a partnership with the council," he said. "Selig directed us to do that."

The council had been working with the National Football League's Philadelphia Eagles, which today is considered the model for a green sports franchise.

The Eagles announced in April that it would reimburse employees who sign up for power produced by wind. The team also plans to add solar power to the team's training camp and corporate offices, said spokeswoman Bonnie Grant.

In Cleveland, Browns spokesman Bill Bonsiewicz said the team is concerned about recycling and alternative energy at the stadium, but noted that the facility is owned by the city.

Across the NFL, teams are beginning to discuss renewables and other green initiatives, said Jack Groh, director of NFL environmental programs. The league has long focused on making the Super Bowl green, he said. "There is no league-wide policy right now, but I see the day that this is going to change and you may start to see more coordinated effort among the teams

Solar Panels To Be Installed at Jacobs Field
WKYC - Channel 3 Cleveland


Created: 6/14/2007 10:47:09 AM
Updated:6/15/2007 1:38:30 PM
http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=69630
CLEVELAND -- The Indians will be turning to the Sun for some extra power this season.
The following is a news release about the ballpark's new solar panels:

CLEVELAND, OH - The Cleveland Indians and Green Energy Ohio are proud to announce the installation of a new solar electric system at Jacobs Field - the first American League ballpark to go solar. The solar installation will provide 8.4 kilowatts of clean, renewable electricity and introduce solar energy concepts to millions in Northeast Ohio.

Green Energy Ohio will work in concert with Doty and Miller Architects to design and install 42 GE solar panels on a newly erected pavilion which will be located on the south-facing upper deck concourse of Jacobs Field, overlooking Carnegie Avenue and I-90.

The electricity produced from the solar installation is enough to power all of the 400 television sets throughout Jacobs Field.

"The Cleveland Indians are committed to exploring the opportunities to help preserve the environment through the use of advanced energy," said JIM FOLK, Indians Vice President of Ballpark Operations. "Using the latest sustainable technologies is not only good for the community, but good for baseball. Working together with Green Energy Ohio, State of Ohio Department of Development, The Cleveland Foundation and Doty and Miller Architects has been a terrific experience in advancing our efforts."

Education is an important aspect of the solar installation at Jacobs Field. Working under a grant from The Cleveland Foundation, Green Energy Ohio is developing a kiosk incorporating data monitoring software to display the output of the solar electric system with a flash program on an LCD monitor at Jacobs Field. The information will also be viewable online. The basics of solar electricity, historical and real-time data, and greenhouse gases avoided will also be explained. A "Solar Day" at Jacobs Field is scheduled for Friday, June 29 in celebration of the project with the community. The Indians play host to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays at 7:05pm that evening.

"We applaud the Cleveland Indians for taking the leadership role in embracing solar power," said CHRISTINA PANOSKA, Program Manager of Green Energy Ohio. "Educating the millions of fans who visit Jacobs Field about renewable energy will be critical to increase the adoption of these technologies."

Support for the solar project is made possible by State of Ohio Department of Development.

The solar installation will be on display during the National SOLAR 2007 conference scheduled at the Cleveland Convention Center from July 7-12. A "Downtown Cleveland Tour" scheduled Sunday, July 8 from 8:00am-Noon will include a visit to Jacobs Field. More information is available at GreenEnergyOhio.org.

Jacobs Field is beaming up with solar panel installation

Ribbon-cutting ceremony today will celebrate ballpark's energy system

Akron Beacon Journal
June 29, 2007
by Bob Downing

Cleveland's Jacobs Field is going solar.

The Cleveland Indians baseball team and Green Energy Ohio will celebrate the $180,000 installation of solar panels to power 400 televisions inside the stadium with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 2 p.m. today.

Jacobs Field is the first American League ballpark to go solar, officials said.

The power -- 8.4 kilowatts of electricity -- will come from 42 solar panels atop a newly erected pavilion on the south-facing upper deck concourse at Jacobs Field.

The panels are 86 feet long and 15 feet high.

The ball team worked with Green Energy Ohio, a nonprofit group, and Doty and Miller Architects on the solar addition.

Assisting on the project were the Cleveland Foundation and the Ohio Department of Development, both of which provided grants.

The team contributed $100,000, the foundation $50,000 and the state $29,400, Indians spokesman Curtis Danburg said.

Green Energy Ohio has developed an informational kiosk at the ball field on the Jacobs Field solar addition.

The information will be available at www.greenenergyohio.org/indians.

The Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland also is adding solar power.

Solar Panels Power Up At Jacobs Field

WKYC - TV, Channel 3
June 29, 2007
Maureen Kyle


 
 
CLEVELAND -- Baseball thrives on sunshine and warm days. Now, it's going to be vital for Jacobs Field.
Solar panels on the upper deck concourse will "power up" all 400 television sets throughout the Jake.

The 42 solar panels can be seen by the thousands that go to a game, as well as anyone driving along I-90 and Carnegie Avenue.

The panels cost $180,000 to install.

So, when will the Jake run completely on renewable energy? Green Energy Ohio will use these panels as a starting point and hope to eventually incorporate wind energy.

Green Energy Ohio, a partner in the demonstration project, has developed an informational kiosk at the ballpark on solar power.

Video